EAS to Sponsor, Exhibit and Participate on Panel at Upcoming FDLI Annual Meeting

EAS is a proud sponsor of the FDLI Annual Conference, taking place in Washington, D.C. May 2-3. In addition, Senior Director Tara Couch will be participating in a breakout session on day one covering a status update on Modified Risk Tobacco Applications. Also in attendance at the conference, Allen Sayler, Senior Director for Food Consulting Services and Cathryn Sacra, Director of Labeling and Cosmetics Cosmetic Consulting Services.  Stop by the EAS table to learn more about our services.

Coleman to Present at CHPA Regulatory and Scientific Affairs Committee Meeting

Senior Director for Pharmaceutical and Device Consulting Services, Bryan Coleman, will speak on recent inspection trends for cosmetic to OTC crossover products at the upcoming CHPA Regulatory and Scientific Affairs Committee Meeting on May 20 in Bethesda, MD. In addition, EAS is a proud sponsor of the Regulatory and Scientific Quality conference which takes place May 21-22, also in Bethesda.

510(k) Guidance and Substantial Equivalence Discussed in MedTech Intelligence

Independent Consultant, Jay Mansour, discussed the movement away from substantial equivalence in favor of performance testing for the 510(k) application process in a recent MedTech Intelligence. “Expanding on the Abbreviated 510(k) Program for demonstrating substantial equivalence for 510(k) premarket submissions, FDA is identifying certain “well understood” medical devices that may be cleared based on performance criteria,” he says.

Sayler Interviewed for Food Processing Magazine Article on Trump’s Effect on Food Industry

EAS Senior Director for Food Consulting Services, Allen Sayler, was interviewed for an article published in Food Processing Magazine on the regulatory state of the food industry under the Trump administration. Published during Scott Gottlieb’s tenure as FDA commissioner, Sayler discussed how Gottleib appeared to have the full confidence of the Trump administration. EAS continues to monitor Agency updates under the acting commissioner, Norman Sharpless.

New EAS Complimentary On-Demand Webinars Available On-Demand

EAS recently presented three complimentary webinars that are now available for on-demand viewing on the EAS website. The first, on the challenges of preparing infant formula notifications presented by EAS Independent Advisor Robert Martin, Ph.D., Independent Consultants Timothy Morck and Robbie Burns and Senior Director for Food Consulting Services covered an overview of filing and safety study requirements. It can now be viewed on-demand on the EAS website.

Next, The FSMA Foreign Supplier Verification Program requires a Qualified Individual, who has the pertinent education and on the job experience enabling him or her to perform their duties, overseeing FSVP. EAS Independent Advisors, Charles Breen and Domenic Veneziano presented an overview of the program as well as addressed common questions asked by the exporters of food products into the U.S. marketplace. Find this on-demand webinar here.

Finally, in late March, Susan Crane, EAS Independent Advisor for OTC Drugs and Labeling discussed cosmetics labeling and claims requirements. Those wishing for a deeper dive into Cosmetics Claims regulations are invited to join Norma Skolnik on May 7 for a look at how words do matter when it comes to marketing a product.

Did You Know? EAS Offers Verification and Validation Services of Electronic Signatures Under 21 CFR Part 11

Increasing usage of electronic methods to capture and produce critical data, which are subject to regulatory scrutiny led to the effect of Title 21 CFR Part 11. This part of the Code of Federal Regulations establishes the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations on electronic records and electronic signatures.

The aim of this regulation is to define the criteria under which the agency will consider electronic records, electronic signatures, and handwritten signatures executed to electronic records to be trustworthy, reliable, and generally equivalent to paper records and handwritten signatures executed on paper.

The FDA released a guidance document in 2003 to clarify how part 11 should be implemented and enforced. This has been updated many times, partly due to the fast-emerging changes in technology. In June 2017, the FDA also issued a draft guidance on the use of Electronic Records and Electronic Signatures in Clinical Investigations.

The FDA takes accountability of electronic signatures very seriously and upon inspection of these records deficiencies may result in a warning letter.

These constantly evolving rules can be daunting to understand and implement. EAS’ team of experts is available to assist your firm in understanding your requirements under 21 CFR Part 11 as well as assess your compliance.  Areas in need of strengthening will be addressed giving your firm a detailed action plan for maintaining compliance for both signatures and storage of electronic data.

FDA to Begin Inspections for Intentional Adulteration in March 2020

FDA recently announced that verification of compliance with the Intentional Adulteration (IA) rule will begin in March 2020. Addressing hazards that may be intentionally introduced to foods, including by acts of terrorism, with the intent to cause wide-spread harm to public health, the IA rule requires the food industry to implement risk-reducing strategies for processes in food facilities that are significantly vulnerable to intentional adulteration. Those food facilities covered by the rule will be required to develop and implement a food defense plan, (which is part of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) requirements), identifying vulnerabilities and mitigation strategies for those vulnerabilities. Additionally, facilities will be required to ensure that the mitigation strategies are working. The first compliance date arrives in July 2019. EAS Consulting Group’s FSMA team can help assess current food defense strategies and strengthen those that do not meet FDA’s stringent requirements.

Final Rule on OTC Hand Sanitizers Issued

FDA issued a Final Rule, effective April 13, 2019, which aims to ensure the safety and effectiveness of OTC hand sanitizers, formally known as topical consumer antiseptic rub products. These products are intended for use without water and marketed under the FDA’s OTC Drug Review.

Active ingredients of ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, which the majority of hand sanitizer rubs on the market contain, have deferred action to allow for the ongoing study and submission of additional safety and effectiveness data to enable FDA’s safety determination for use in OTC consumer antiseptic rub products.  At this time, FDA states that it does not intend to take action to remove hand sanitizers containing these three active ingredients from the market and their status will be addressed either after completion and analysis of the studies or at another time, if these studies are not completed.

However, 28 other active ingredients, identified in the 2016 Consumer Antiseptic Rub proposed rule, including triclosan and benzethonium chloride, are no longer eligible for inclusion in any future OTC monograph.

This long awaited rule finalizes a June 30, 2016 proposed rule on consumer antiseptic rubs, where FDA requested additional scientific data to support the safety and effectiveness of active ingredients used in OTC consumer antiseptic rubs. FDA has determined that less than 3% of the marketplace will be affected by the issuance of this final rule, as most OTC consumer antiseptic rubs use ethyl alcohol as the active ingredient.

Concerned companies may contact EAS to learn more about how this Final Rule impacts product formulations and compliance with the OTC monograph.

2019 May Ask the Expert

Each month, EAS selects one question sent in by readers to be answered by one of our experts. This month’s question is answered by George Yanulis D.Eng., an expert in medical device safety and the 510(k) process.

Question: Why is FDA proposing to change the 510(k) submission process for medical devices?

Yanulis: The rapid technological advances in the medical device arena have been dramatic. A 510(k), otherwise known as a Premarket Notification, is the mechanism by which device manufacturers notify FDA of their intent to market a medical device at least 90 days in advance of doing so. By reviewing the data in a 510(k), FDA is able to determine whether the device is equivalent to a device already placed into one of the three classification categories, Class I (General Controls requiring the least amount of regulatory control because they present minimal harm to users), Class II, (General Controls with Special Controls that must comply with specific labeling requirements, mandatory performance standards and postmarket surveillance) or Class III, (those devices requiring a PMA due to insufficient information to assure the safety and effectiveness solely through general or special controls. As a consultant, Class III medical devices have been my primary focus, particularly in the ICD and cardiac pacemaker device areas.

On November 26, 2018, then FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced changes to the process for approving medical devices for the U.S. market aimed at dramatically revamping the popular 510(k) clearance pathway which enables approvals based on predicates. FDA recognizes its current approach has the potential to limit advancing technological innovation and FDA is now looking to limit the age of predicates to ten years in order to avoid using outdated technologies as older predicates are less relevant to today’s requirements of interconnectivity and complexity.

FDA is proposing an approval outside of the 510(k) process if the comparable device being used is older than a decade, a change that would significantly disrupt the current process through which the vast majority, (80%) of devices are approved. FDA proposes creating a new alternative 510(k) pathway that will focus on objective safety and performance criteria. While devices more than 10 years old are not believed to be unsafe, nor would those devices need to be removed from the market, the change will encourage use of more modern predicates and as such encourage competition to adopt modern technologies and features while improving overall standards and improving outcomes.

As an expert who has collaborated directly with the FDA and particularly with CDRH, I welcome these changes. My expectation is that all devices will continue to be safe and effective, and substantially equivalent as dictated in the 510(k).

You may find some of the below FDA resources to be helpful, and please contact EAS with specific questions regarding your 510(k) filing.

https://www.fda.gov/medicaldevices/productsandmedicalprocedures/deviceapprovalsandclearances/510kclearances/

https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Training/CDRHLearn/UCM421766.pdf

Big Data, Real World Evidence and The Digital Revolution – Hang On!

Executives from AbbVie, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck and Co., Johnson and Johnson, Pfizer and Sanofi were grilled on Capital Hill in February on topics ranging from drug pricing, reimbursement, rebates and patent extensions to executive compensation. Senators called for new actions to address the high cost of prescription drugs in America.

Costs to the consumer and healthcare systems are immense. The US spent 345 billion USD on prescription drugs in 2018 and growth estimates could reach 500 billion by 2025. Although not discussed at the hearing, a significant portion (15% to 20%) of the pharma revenue stream is used for pharmaceutical R and D. This investment is the lifeblood of the global pharmaceutical industry. However, discovery, development and commercialization of a NCE or biologic could cost as much as 2.0 billion USD when failures and opportunity costs are taken into consideration. Adding to the cost and risk is the complexity of modern drug development. Establishing drug safety, determining efficacy and ensuring product quality are expensive tasks that must be monitored by sponsors and regulatory agencies. Then, there is the issue of reimbursement: market access, value proposition and pricing are the domain of the commercial payers, the new stakeholder with requirements that must be addressed in all development and commercialization scenarios.

Designing and aligning the appropriate regulatory strategy for each development asset is a critical component of program success. Here are a few of the emerging topics in drug development that should be contemplated when constructing the regulatory pathway for a NCE or biologic.

“Big Data” is a term used to describe large complex historical data sets that can be extracted and analyzed using methods that are different from traditional data management procedures. One application of “big data” gaining some traction in clinical trial design is the use of historical information to create a “synthetic” control arm instead of a traditional placebo treatment. The use of synthetic controls will never replace the randomized controlled study design but the new analysis tools for complex “big data” sets could cut control groups in half or replace them altogether, especially when traditional designs become prohibitive or historical data is complete and well-characterized.

Real World Evidence (RWE) and Patient Centricity. RWE is information collected outside of a formal clinical trial. It includes electronic medical records, claims and billing data, patient and disease registries and data gathered through wearable digital devices. In a recent address to the National Academy of Sciences and in a subsequent publication, CDER’s Janet Woodcock advocated for the use of RWE as a way of collecting and using patient data in clinical trials. Woodcock noted there has been little use of RWE in drug regulatory decisions regarding drug effectiveness. A draft guidance on RWE and a framework for its use is in the works at FDA and scheduled for release in 2020. Further, regulatory agencies have been asking for information on how clinical trials can be “fit for purpose” “with the patient population. Sponsors are now checking protocol design and interventions with patients, not just investigators, KOLs and internal experts. Patient centricity will be very relevant in future regulatory dossier reviews and approvals.

The Digital Health Revolution. Ten years ago it was hard to envision that connectable biosensors, wearables, implantables, smartphone applications, artificial intelligence, remote patient monitoring and machine learning would impact data collection and enable the emergence of personalized medicine. Now, many study protocols use digital and mobile technology as an integral part of study execution.

Value Proposition and Reimbursement. The “fee for care” model used in healthcare is shifting to value-based reimbursement. While regulatory approval requires demonstration of patient safety and efficacy, payer access requires a clear demonstration of a value proposition to qualify for reimbursement. Pipeline commercial development centered on pricing, market access and payer acceptance are now built into development programs long before final investment decisions are made at the governance level. Elements of the value proposition could include differentiation over standard-of-care, price, ease of use and innovative packaging.

These are just a few of the issues that impact strategic regulatory drug development right now. There are others: biosimilars, regulatory guidance for cell and gene therapy and precision medicine applications to minimize patient variability and improve response rate. On top of all this, regulators and sponsors will have to guide new product promotion to be consistent with product labeling as drug development and regulatory approval become more complex.

EAS offers a wealth of knowledge, enabling the development of regulatory strategies that best position your products in today’s environment. For more information or to discuss your product’s challenges contact Bryan J. Coleman, Senior Director for Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices at bcoleman@easconsultinggroup.com. We also invite you to view our industry services sheet or the pharmaceutical tab on the EAS website.

Pharma’s Big Data, Real World Evidence and The Digital Revolution

Dear Reader,

Edward A. Steele

Welcome to the May 2019 edition of EAS-e-News, the free newsletter dedicated to FDA regulated industries.It has been a busy month at EAS, with the release of new complimentary On-Demand webinars, announcements of new training seminars, publication of numerous articles on a wide-variety of subjects as well as a fantastic attendance at the EAS booth during the recent Supplyside East. For those of you who had an opportunity to meet with Tara Couch, our senior director for dietary supplements and Heather Fairman, one of our expert independent consultants I am sure you came away with a lot of great information on EAS and how we can begin to assist your company with any number of FDA requirements. For those who were unable to attend, I invite you to take a look at our quick reference information sheets to learn more about EAS. We are always glad to speak with you about your GMP questions or concerns.

If you will be in Geneva for Vitafoods Europe, May 7-9 we invite you to come by the EAS booth, B149, to meet Tara Couch and Charles Breen, our Independent Advisor for FSMA. In addition to exhibiting at Vitafoods, EAS is a proud training partner for the show, offering a one-day comprehensive look at GMPs for the dietary supplement industry. Registrations for this seminar, taking place May 6, the day before the official start of Vitafoods, is being handled through Vitafoods directly. In addition, Charles Breen will be speaking as part of the technical sessions on hygienic commitments for food safety.

FDA has OMB approval to initiate a short voluntary survey of the cosmetics industry, which will assess a variety of GMP aspects such as building and grounds, written procedures, materials and manufacturing and more. This survey is important to help FDA gain a better understanding of the current state of industry GMPs and the results provided to FDA will have no identifying information, nor will responses be used by the agency to initiate enforcement actions. A Federal Register notice regarding the survey can be found here and we encourage cosmetics firms to participate in this effort.

In other FDA news, a new effort to bolster the collaboration between FDA and the Customs and U.S. Border Patrol (CBP) is underway to better protect against illegal and harmful products from gaining entry into the U.S. through the mail system, or other ports of entry, through the enhancement of knowledge transfer, reduction in duplication of efforts and streamlining mission efficiencies. More information on this effort can be found in the What’s New at FDA section of this edition.

As mentioned earlier, we are pleased that numerous compliance seminars are both approaching and new on the horizon. Our next GMP One-day Refresher training will take place in Andover, MA on August 13, just outside of Boston. This one-day session is designed as an opportunity to outsource your department’s GMP refresher training. At just $300 per registration it is a great and cost-effective opportunity for your entire team to learn from our experts. More information about our August session as well as the November Refresher which will take place on Long Island can be found on the EAS website.

Our fall food labeling, dietary supplement labeling and dietary supplement GMP seminars have just been announced. Join us this November in Irvine, CA for a deep two-day dive into these challenging FDA requirements. More information can be found in the EAS in Action section of this issue.

Additionally, we have two complimentary webinars coming up in May. On May 7 join Norma Skolnik for a look at how FDA eyes certain cosmetics claims and on May 14 join Jeff Roberts for a look at compliance with 21 CFR Part 11. Also, on June 13 we invite you to join EAS Senior Director for Pharmaceuticals and Devices, Bryan Coleman for a look at GMPs for OTCs.

Our issue of the month is written by John Brennan and looks at pharma big data, real world evidence and the Digital Revolution and our Ask the Expert on FDA’s plans to revamp the 510(k) process is answered by George Yanulis. Finally, I am pleased to welcome a new independent consultant, Dennis Gaalswyck and a new office manager, Kate Gibson. Learn more in our Who’s Who section of this edition.

As always, thank you for your interest in EAS and we invite you to share this newsletter with your colleagues.

Sincerely,

Edward A. Steele Signature

Ed Steele
Chairman and CEO

GMPs for OTCs – Improving Compliance as FDA Eyes Enforcement Actions

June 13, 2019 at 1:00 pm eastern

Presented by Bryan Coleman, EAS Senior Director for Drugs and Medical Devices

June 13, 2019 Webinar

With more than 80 therapeutic categories, Over-the-Counter (OTC) drug products play an ever-increasing role in health care. FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) working in conjunction with the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) ensures that OTC products are safe to use, appropriately labeled, adverse events reports are filed and that all products are manufactured under the appropriate quality control measures. Generally, the FDA’s first and best opportunity to assess the quality and compliance conformance of an OTC drug will be during an on-site inspection of the manufacturing facility. From a Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) perspective, manufacturers must recognize that the FDA applies the same, stringent 21 CFR 210 and 211 drug GMP standards to OTC products just as prescription drugs are held to. Thus, OTC drug manufacturers (and contract manufacturers) must maintain vigilance at all times with all aspects of production quality and documentations. From the physical plant and grounds, employee training, testing and specifications, including Out of Specifications (OOS) results management, compliance expectations with 21 CFR 211 are clearly articulated. Register

About the Presenter

Bryan Coleman

Bryan Coleman

Join Bryan Coleman, EAS Senior Director for Drugs and Medical Devices for a complimentary webinar on June 13, 2019 at 1:00 pm eastern where he will discuss the specifics of GMP compliance under 21 CFR Part 211 and common pitfalls that warrant increased FDA attention.

EAS Partners with Vitafoods Europe for Dietary Supplement GMP Training

May 6, 2019

Geneva, Switzerland

Vitafoods Europe

EAS Consulting Group is pleased to announce a partnership with Vitafoods Europe as the exclusive training partner for Dietary Supplement Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs). EAS Senior Director for Dietary Supplement and Tobacco Services, Tara Lin Couch, Ph.D. will present a one-day training on GMPs in advance of the 2019 Vitafoods Europe on Monday 6 May, the day before Vitafoods Europe 2019 official opens its doors.

The training will cover critical information needed to comply with the rules that govern the responsibilities of domestic and foreign firms who manufacture, label, pack or hold dietary supplements for sale in the United States, including those involved with the testing, quality control and distribution of supplements. This training will help firms understand their GMP requirements in an in-person personalized setting, providing an opportunity to learn directly from our GMP expert and ask specific questions regarding GMP issues or situations.

In addition, EAS Independent Advisor for the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), Charles Breen, will speak at the Vitafoods Europe main conference on Supplier Hygienic Commitments and EAS will exhibit at Vitafoods Europe at stand B149. We invite you to stop by the booth or make an appointment to discuss your regulatory US FDA compliance challenges.

Vitafoods Europe is the premier dietary supplement, food and nutraceutical trade show held in Europe. From May 7-9, 2019 thousands of leaders across the globe including suppliers of ingredients, raw materials and the companies which service them will come together to create innovation, connect with business leaders and find effective solutions. Vitafoods is dedicated to covering the entire nutraceutical supply chain – from ingredient to shelf.

Qualified Individuals – FDA’s Final Link in the Chain of Food Safety and Food Imports

The Food Safety Modernization Act, signed into law in 2011, includes an important provision for food importers under the Foreign Supplier Verification Program (FSVP) Final Rule. Namely, Part 1 Subpart L, Section §1.503 requires that importers of human and animal food enlist a Qualified Individual (QI) who has responsibility for developing a program and performing each activity under the program to ensure that the products that they are importing are not adulterated or misbranded (in regards to allergens) and have been produced in accordance with the preventive control regulations for human or animal food (CFR §117 & 507 respectfully), or the Produce Safety Rule (CFR §112).

Companies importing finished food and food ingredients for further processing into the U.S. must have a QI, either an employee or someone contracted to perform QI duties. This FSVP QI looks at each supplier closely and determines whether the foods or food ingredients they produce meet FDA’s strict safety requirements by assessing the supplier’s food safety plans and determining whether adequate controls are in place that would reduce or minimize harm due to biological, chemical and physical hazards. The QI would also have to identify verification activities that would ensure that the hazards are being addressed. Based on the type of activity identified, the importer may also have to enlist a Qualified Auditor (QA) to perform this function.

Everyone with a role in the importation of foreign sourced foods should be familiar with applicable FSVP requirements including brokers ,exporting shippers, foreign suppliers, and others. This comprehensive approach can help better protect food safety.

Join EAS Independent Advisor for FSMA and former FDA Seattle District Officer, Charles Breen and EAS Independent Advisor for Import Operations and former Director of the FDA’s Division of Import Operations, Domenic Veneziano, for an informative and fast-paced webinar on understanding the requirements of an FDA Qualified Individual and Auditor.

About the Presenters

Charles Breen, Independent Advisor, FSMA Consulting Services

Mr. Breen became available to EAS Consulting Group after a distinguished career at the FDA working in areas such as HACCP and LACF and BSE prohibited materials in the dairy. Mr. Breen has worked with the industry on compliance issues related to the Bioterrorism Act of 2003 and led the field and HQ professionals in developing and implementing surveillance and compliance programs, and initial FSMA training implementation. His attention to detail has garnered him an FDA Award of Merit, Outstanding Achievement and five Commissioner Special Citations.

Domenic Veneziano, Independent Advisor, Import Operations

Mr. Veneziano is a veteran FDA specialist with over 24 years of Agency experience. He served as director of the FDA’s Division of Import Operations for more than ten years. In that role, he was responsible for oversight of FDA’s import operations program and provided leadership, guidance, and direction to approximately 1,000 field investigators in more than 320 U.S. ports of entry. He also served as co-lead in the development of the FSMA import regulations and was the senior advisor on the implementation of FSMA and the FDA Safety and Innovation Act. Mr. Veneziano began his FDA career in 1992 as a field investigator in the New England District specializing in medical device inspections. In 1998 he became a supervisory investigator in New England overseeing the medical device and import programs.

Regulatory, Technical and Formulations for New Infant Formula Notifications – Challenges and Opportunities

Presented by EAS Independent Consultants Robbie Burns, Ph.D. and Timothy Morck, Ph.D. and Independent Advisor for Food and Color Additive Safety, Robert Martin, Ph.D.

The submission stage of a New Infant Formula Notification may seem like the beginning of the end of a years-long process of research and strategic development. But, without all the right documentation in place, this last step prior to product launch can be unnecessarily delayed for those companies not well-prepared for the rigors of FDA review and assessment.

Just some of the roadblocks Infant Formulas face is that all ingredients must be GRAS specifically for Infant Formula use, Approved Food Additives, or have a history of safe use in U.S. formulas. The submissions which demonstrate this must also show that their formulations deliver on nutrient label declarations throughout shelf-life with nutrient levels within FDA-established ranges. Some examples of required studies include Protein Efficiency Ratio test for protein quality, nutritional shelf life stability studies and infant growth monitoring studies, all which must demonstrate the product is produced under processing conditions that assure safe and consistent formulas. Finally, when all the data is available it is assembled into a well-designed New Infant Formula Notification (NIFN) which is submitted to and reviewed by FDA. Learn the steps to NIFNs as well as the pitfalls and challenges companies face in leading up to the assembling of an Infant Formula dossier. EAS Consulting Group’s experts, scientists, and leaders in their fields at FDA and industry will walk you through challenges and pitfalls which delay or prevent final FDA approval of this most important nutrient for growing infants. Join Robert Martin, Ph.D., Robert Burns, Ph.D. and Timothy Morck, Ph.D. for an informative and technical overview of one of FDA’s most challenging applications.

Learn more about EAS services with New Infant Formula Notifications as Allen Sayler and Robbie Burns, Ph.D. share critical information on FDA expectations for safety and submissions of NFINs.

About the Presenters

Robert Martin, Ph.D., Independent Advisor, Food and Color Additive Safety

Dr. Robert Martin is a former deputy director of FDA’s Division of Biotechnology and GRAS Notice Review. His 38-year career at the agency included service as a research chemist and as a consumer safety officer in the Division of Food and Color Additives. He became a supervisor and team leader after that division was renamed the Division of Petition Control. Dr. Martin holds a Ph.D. in chemistry from Georgetown University.

Robert Burns, Ph.D., Independent Consultant

Robert, “Robbie” Burns retired from the Grocery Manufacturers Association as former Vice President of Health and Nutrition Policy. Previously, he was the Global Nutrition and Scientific Affairs Director at Cadbury Schweppes where he worked to establish consistent global standards and strategies for the improvement of product pipelines. Prior to Cadbury, he was at Mead Johnson Nutritionals where he worked on the scientific and regulatory aspects of new and reformulated infant formulas, Medical Foods and other nutritional products. Robbie has a Ph.D. in Nutritional Biochemistry from Queens University in Belfast, Ireland with Postdoctoral Research Fellowships at the Universities of Nottingham and Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of nearly 50 papers and articles and has been an invited speaker at dozens of international symposiums and conferences.

Timothy Morck, Ph.D., Independent Consultant

Timothy Morck provides expertise in nutrition-related research, product development, regulatory and public policy and global scientific affairs. Dr. Morck’s career includes clinical nutrition practice, research, and medical school faculty appointments, scientific association management, entrepreneurial personalized nutrition start-ups, and executive and senior management positions at several global food, nutrition and pharmaceutical companies including The Dannon Company, Mead Johnson Nutritionals, Abbott Nutrition, Nestle Health Science and Nestle Corporate Affairs. The interplay between the legal, scientific, and regulatory framework surrounding medical foods has been a particularly sharp focus for him. He received a B.S. in animal science from Penn State University, followed by MS and Ph.D. degrees in nutrition (biochemistry & physiology minors) from Cornell University.

The Future of Homeopathy Discussed in ISPE iSpeak blog

ISPE Logo

EAS Independent Advisor for OTC Drugs and Labeling, Susan Crane, published a blog discussing the future of Homeopathy on the International Society of Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE) blog page iSpeak. FDA and FTC are taking a more proactive approach to homeopathic drugs indicating that they will be held to the same standard as other products with regard to claims.

Jeffrey Roberts to Discuss 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance with Electronic Signatures

Regardless of the type of industry, if you are regulated by the FDA you are bound by the rules around electronic data integrity. Whether preparing to release a finished batch of material, making decisions on data and information that was created and generated electronically or preparing to file a technical dossier with the FDA; your electronic recordkeeping and other electronic data forms require more than just being available for review and inspection. The FDA requires these sources of evidence to be generated, processed and maintained in a manner that provides complete traceability, prevents unauthorized alteration and requires a verified electronic signature that ensures identity and authenticity. Learn the specifics of Part 11 requirements for electronic signatures with Jeffrey Roberts on May 14, 2019. This complimentary webinar will discuss how record keeping is inclusive of a larger focus on GMPs for electronic records that are created, modified, maintained, archived, retrieved, or transmitted as well the specifics of content that must be included in these records for verification and validation.

Crossing T’s and Dotting I’s – Preparing for a FDA Preventive Controls Inspection

Dear Reader,

Welcome to the April 2019 edition of EASeNews, the free newsletter for industries regulated by FDA.

Edward A. Steele

We are pleased to announce our latest short video describing the many services that EAS provides. This month our regulatory specialist, Victoria Pankovich, shares the various FDA requirements for company registrations and product listings. As you may know, the complexities of registrations differ by product category, and not all commodities are required to list their products. EAS helps you to sort through what is required and what information is needed to comply with FDA regulations in this regard. Should you wish to outsource this annual or biannual requirement, EAS is available to help.

If we missed you at our recent food and dietary supplement labeling compliance seminars in Philadelphia, it is not too late to purchase the companion handbook for the seminar. The Food Labeling Handbook and the Dietary Supplement Labeling Handbook were written by instructor Gisela Leon and share points on how to ensure label accuracy, from what and how information must be covered to more detailed specifics of FDA compliance. To purchase your copy please visit the EAS store.

If you haven’t registered for our one-day seminar Ensuring Regulatory Compliance of GMP Laboratories seminar which will be taught by Senior Director Tara Lin Couch, Ph.D. in Denver on April 23, there is still time. This one-day intensive program will discuss FDA’s current GMP requirements for Research and Development and Quality Control Laboratories and will highlight FDA issues of concern with emphasis placed on recent FDA regulatory or administrative actions. All of this will allow participants to gain an understanding of the importance of laboratory GMPs and how to meet FDA’s requirements. Please join us in Denver!

Our issue of the month author is Joe Famiglietti who discusses preparing for a FDA Preventive Controls inspection. Our Ask the Expert is answered by Tim Hansen and discusses how seafood importers can protect themselves from unscrupulous suppliers. Lastly our new section, Did you Know? covers EAS expert witness considerations, an area in which EAS is proud to have deep roots with our over 50 independent consultants who can act in an expert witness capacity.

We welcome a number of new consultants this month: Robert Post, Heidi Stuttz, Jan Janson, William Scopa and Joel Martinez. I invite you to learn more about their backgrounds in Who’s Who.

Thank you as always for your interest in EAS and please feel free to forward this newsletter onto a colleague or link with us on LinkedIn.

Sincerely,

Edward A. Steele Signature

Ed Steele
Chairman and CEO

Peyton Discusses Continued Confusion Over Hemp Products in Cannabis Industry Journal

Cannabis Industry Journal Logo

Charlotte Peyton, a noted expert in cannabis, has published an article in a recent Cannabis Industry Journal. She discusses FDA’s stance with Hemp, CBD versus Isolates, and good manufacturing practice considerations. You may also wish to view the recent 2018 Farm Bill and the Cannabis Industry webinar presented by Attorney Marc Ullman, Of Counsel with Rivkin Radler and Tara Lin Couch, PhD, Senior Director of Dietary Supplement and Tobacco Services. This webinar is available on-demand on the EAS website.

Preparing For a FDA Preventive Controls Inspection

The new rule on Preventative Controls for Human Food is mandated by the 2011 FDA Food Safety Modernization Act. Preventive Controls (PC) are steps that a food facility must take to reduce or eliminate food safety hazards. The rule also includes updates to the Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) requirements such as mandatory training and procedures to control allergen cross-contact. In general, the new rule applies to you if you are required to register with FDA and if you manufacture, process, pack or hold foods. By now, all firms meeting the activities in the prior sentence have to be in compliance with the PC rule unless they are exempt or subject to modified requirements. 

Firms covered by the new rule must have and implement a written food safety plan (FSP) and are further required to conduct a hazard analysis in order to identify food safety hazards requiring controls including preventive controls. The new rule requires an appropriate control be developed and implemented that could include process, allergen, sanitation or other controls. When preventive controls are required, the FSP must also include written procedures for monitoring, corrective actions, verification (including validation as deemed necessary) and supporting records, as well as a written recall plan and a supply chain program. The FSP must be prepared or its preparation overseen by a preventive controls qualified individual (PCQI).           

If your company is using an existing HACCP program, changes are required in developing a FSP because control need not always be at a CCP (critical control point), but can be handled by a prerequisite program or a preventative control program. For example, allergen cross-contact can be controlled by a written sanitation preventative control program that requires proper cleaning methods be implemented rather than establishing critical limits at a CCP.

The preparation of a proper FSP is crucial, since this is one of the first documents FDA will likely request to see during a PC inspection. There is no standardized or required format for the FSP, but all of the elements as required in 21 CFR 117.126(b) must be in the written document. FDA has published guidance regarding the preparation of a FSP and hazard analysis. See https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA/UC517391.pdf.

You can expect FDA to arrive unannounced to conduct a PC inspection unless you are located outside of the US, in which case FDA will provide written notice prior to arriving. During the inspection you can expect FDA to carefully review your company’s written food safety programs and to review all required records, such as monitoring and verification records. If deemed necessary, FDA may collect extensive environmental monitoring microbiological samples throughout your facility to determine if pathogens are in the plant environment. If there are positive sample results for pathogens, FDA can require products to be recalled. FDA can also compare the DNA fingerprints of any pathogens found to isolates in the CDC’s database and then require recalls if any matches are identified. If FDA deems your facility as not being compliant, you can expect the agency to take regulatory actions against your firm if voluntary compliance is not taken

You can properly prepare for an FDA PC inspection by considering the following:

Have a written plan covering how your company will handle an FDA inspection that includes a working area for the FDA and that assigns responsibilities for your employees who will be involved in the inspection. You need to have a policy on how to handle any objectionable conditions FDA may bring to your attention and make an attempt to correct any of these conditions while FDA is on-site.

Be sure your FSP is in final form and is signed by your firm’s owner, operator or agent in charge and be sure there is at least one person who is familiar with the overall food safety program who can explain it to the FDA.

Have training records readily available including PCQI training / qualifications, employee sanitation training and records documenting the qualifications all employees including supervisors.

Be sure record keeping is in order and is easily accessible including monitoring and verification records. 

If operational or FSP deviations have occurred, be sure appropriate corrective actions have been taken supported by records that must be made available for FDA review.

Be sure your allergen control procedures are in order. All ingredient labels should be reviewed to assure they are accurate and contain all required allergen labeling. Be sure all cGMPs are being followed to prevent unintentional allergen cross-contact issues during ingredient receipt, storage, process, packaging and labeling operations.

Conduct your own environmental monitoring. FDA will likely swab for microbes if you are producing ready-to-eat (RTE) foods that are exposed to the environment prior to packaging. You need to be sure you are conducting an appropriate monitoring program before FDA arrives. If problem areas are identified, corrective actions need to be implemented.

If product testing is used to verify a control, be sure the test is scientifically valid and have corrective action procedures in the event of positive results.

You must conduct reanalysis of the FSP at least once every three years or whenever there is a significant change that effects food safety.

Be sure you have information and records regarding where raw materials are sourced and documentation that the materials are being purchased from approved vendors. It is no longer an option to purchase raw materials from just any source. The new rule requires there must be a supply chain program which includes documentation demonstrating that either suppliers provide safe raw materials, or that another party will apply controls for the hazard.

For food with a hazard requiring a PC, there is now a requirement to have a written recall procedure that includes descriptions of the steps to be taken as well as assigning responsibility for taking those steps.

Conduct or hire an experienced consultant to perform a mock FDA inspection that includes a thorough sanitation audit and review of your programs and records. Conducting a gap analysis audit of your operation will assist in identifying areas that require improvement before FDA finds them.

Be sure all labels being used have been reviewed and approved by a food label expert. In summary, FDA is in full enforcement mode related to the FSMA Preventive Controls regulation. The food manufacturing industry needs to have its food safety program updated to incorporate the Preventive Control provisions. Your PCQI and entire QA staff as well as plant supervisors should be prepared to answer FDA’s questions and demonstrate that you conduct your business in a preventive mode of operation. With proper planning you can have a positive experience from an FDA PC-based inspection and continue to provide consumers with safe foods.

Join EAS at SupplySide East Booth F152

SupplySideEast logo 2018


Tara Lin Couch, Ph.D. and Independent Consultant Heather Fairman will represent EAS at the upcoming SupplySide East in Secaucus, NJ April 9-10, 2019. This is a great opportunity to meet the EAS team to discuss your questions regarding dietary supplement regulations and how to prepare for cannabis GMPs. If you would like to schedule a meeting at SupplySide East please contact us.

Armstrong Publishes Article on the Delaney Clause in FDLI Update

FDLI Logo

Steve Armstrong, EAS Independent Advisor for Food Law and Regulation, is co-author of an article published in the March 2019 Food Drug Law Institute Update Magazine covering FDA’s recent decision to delist six synthetic ingredients as required by the Delaney Clause, a 60-year-old provision of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) which states, in plain language that FDA may not approve any food additive—even one that is safe—if it is “found to induce cancer” in laboratory animals. Steve hypothesizes as to whether it is time to repeal the Delaney Clause.

Meet Issue of the Month Author, Joe Famiglietti

Joe Famiglietti

Independent Consultant, Joe Famiglietti, provides guidance to clients regarding FDA compliance matters. He has performed onsite audits at food manufacturing facilities and evaluated production and quality control operations for compliance with FDA regulations. Joe has experience in inspections of food manufacturing areas including low acid canned foods, acidified foods, infant formula and seafood HACCP. He assists in facility sanitation issues, provides in-house training to employees on food GMP issues and procedures for handling FDA inspections. Prior to consulting, Joe was a Compliance Officer at the FDA New York District, Import Operations Branch in Buffalo.

2019 April Ask the Expert

Each month, EAS answers one question sent in by our readers. This month’s Ask the Expert is answered by Independent Consultant and former head of the NOAA Seafood Inspection Program and Division Director in FDA’s Office of Seafood, Timothy Hansen. Tim has extensive experience in seafood regulatory affairs, certification, and advises the seafood industry on science and technological matters. If you would like to ask a question of one of our experts, click here.

Question: As a seafood importer how can I protect myself from fraudulent suppliers?

Hansen: The seafood industry is mostly comprised of smart, hardworking, honest professionals that take regulatory compliance seriously, and a few unscrupulous operators who aim to misrepresent their products for financial gain or enhanced competitive advantage. It would be wise for all firms and particularly importers of seafood to be aware of some of the more common fraudulent practices so that you can protect your firm, your customers and ward off FDA enforcement action by perpetuating fraud to your customers. Some types of fraudulent activities to be aware of:

Species substitution, usually representing a lower cost but similar species as a higher cost or higher quality species such as Chum Salmon for Coho Salmon. When this occurs, not only is the fish fraudulent but so too is the labeling including PDP, weight declaration and nutritional information.

In other cases, suppliers may provide a fraudulent shipment weight due to overglazing of ice, overbreading that exceeds USDC, NIST or AOAC standards, or even what is called “rat packing” where the superior product is on top, hiding the inferior product underneath.

According to the NOAA Fisheries Seafood Inspection Program, as of 2014 around 30% of seafood in the U.S. is considered fraudulent. This can be attributed to intentional fraud where the seafood operator is looking to gain an unearned profit, “best” the competition, or they commit fraud due to pressures stemming from the inability to fill customer orders. In other cases, unintentional fraud may also be committed, attributed to honest mistakes such as the misinterpretation of regulations or miscommunications and messaging errors due to poor process controls which lead to unknowingly receiving and accepting a fraudulent product from a supplier.

There are a number of ways the seafood industry can protect themselves, the most obvious of which is to develop relationships with reputable suppliers and to regularly inspect incoming shipments. In addition, if your firm does not already have fully developed product specifications guidelines consider creating these as part of your business operations plan. You will also want to have a Quality plan in addition to your HACCP plan and enhance your labeling controls beyond the minimum HACCP requirements. Consider also utilizing process control techniques such as statistical weight control charts and Quality Assurance software.

Protocols for all Quality, HACCP and other SOPs must be developed by a competent person, either within your organization or created by an outside entity, such as EAS, with expertise specific to the seafood industry. Ensuring compliant process control techniques can significantly increase your company’s integrity, leading to a satisfied customer, and reduce your risk of regulatory action.

EAS has a team of experts with career histories in FDA inspections and the seafood industry. If we can help your company to create or improve your compliance programs, please give us a call. We invite you to view our many industry services facts sheets on the EAS website, or more specifically that which pertains to our seafood services.

Norma Skolnik Presents Webinar on Cosmetic Claims

In the competitive cosmetics world, discerning consumers are carefully considering product purchases to determine which offer the results they are hoping to achieve. In response, the pressure on marketing and labeling teams may entice to push the envelope with regards to product claims. However, words do matter, particularly in the eyes of FDA. Learn how the words used on a cosmetic label can alter the intended meaning of a claim and FDA views on them. Ensure your cosmetic products are labeled and marketed in a compliant manner, offering consumers an accurate understanding of what they can expect and protecting your products from FDA concerns. Join Norma Skolnik on May 7, 2019 for a complimentary webinar and ensure your cosmetic product labeling and claims are compliant with FDA regulations.

EAS Sponsors CHPA Regulatory Scientific and Quality Conference, Coleman to Present

CHPA May 21-21, 2019

EAS is a proud event sponsor for the upcoming CHPA Regulatory Scientific and Quality Conference taking place in Bethesda, MD May 21-22, 2019. In addition, Bryan J. Coleman, Senior Director for Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices will be speaking on Recent FDA inspection trends in Cosmetic to OTC cross-over products at a special Regulatory & Scientific Affairs Committee meeting which is being held May 20, before the kick-off of RSQ.

EAS to Present on Pharma Data Integrity at CPhI North America

CPHI North America 2018 logo

EAS Independent Consultant, Brian Nadel, is an invited speaker on the subject of Pharma Data Integrity at the upcoming CPhI North America which will be held in Chicago April 30-May 2, 2019. Join Brian for a discussion on the reasons why once FDA considers some of a company’s data to be inaccurate it considers all of their data to be inaccurate. Brian will also discuss methods for ensuring data integrity both now and in the future.

Meet New Consultants for April 2019

Robert Post, Ph.D., MEd., MSc.

Robert Post

Dr. Robert Post is a former food industry executive, White House and regulatory agency executive, and university instructor with expertise in food science and nutrition. His roles in the food industry have included leading nutrition and regulatory affairs; corporate health and wellness programs; and food and health communications to support marketing and customers/sales. He has also directed legislative affairs, food ingredient specifications and approvals, food product design and innovation, food labeling and nutrition labeling strategies, design, and compliance; and brand communications strategies for customers, consumers, and health professionals. In the Federal sector, Rob directed the agencies that set the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, created MyPlate(.gov), and the national nutrition evidence library, supporting the White House as a key nutrition advisor. All roles involved expert mining of food and nutrition research and setting research pipelines for product design and product and process claims substantiation. Prior to consulting Rob was the Senior Director for Chobani Health and Wellness and Regulatory Affairs. He also served as the Executive Director for Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion in the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Heidi Stuttz

Heidi Stuttz

Heidi Stuttz is an expert in biotech and medical device oversight. She assists clients with a variety of projects including R&D programs, FDA submissions, EMEA dossiers, compliance enhancements and quality improvement initiatives. Assisting with product development processes from clinical trials to commercialization, Heidi demonstrates proven success with facilitating product development and moving regulatory programs forward. Heidi is experienced with auditing cGMPs for continuous process improvements, FDA ISO9000, records management as well as laboratory compliance/controls and validation and facilities and utility validation and remediation. She has worked as a Senior Project/Program Manager with Solution Systems and as a Quality Assurance Specialist at Wyeth Vaccines Division. Heidi has a M.S. from Johns Hopkins University, with degree in Biotechnology, Enterprise and Entrepreneurship, and concentration in Legal/Regulatory.

William Scopa

William Scopa

Mr. Scopa has over 30 years at Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at both ports of entry and Headquarters. During 15 years at the ports, he processed both the import and export clearance of cargo and passengers. At Headquarters, as a Branch Chief, he led the development of policies and procedures. These policies and procedures addressed such areas as, Intellectual Property Rights, Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Duties, and revenue collections. He spent several years leading CBP’s trade enforcement efforts in targeting evasion such as misclassification and undervaluation. His last position was CBP’s liaison to other government agencies and he worked with the other agencies to develop CBP import processing of the other agency imports for such agencies as EPA, FDA, and DEA. These processes included clearing other agency cargo under the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE).

Jan Janson

Jan Janson

Jan Janson is a quality consultant who provides assessments and recommendations on QMS development, Quality and Supplier Management. He conducts internal and supplier audits, develops product quality initiatives, supports CAPA and complaint analysis and more. In addition, Jan has extensive experience with audits against GMPs, Process Validation Reviews including process, software and methods and helps firms develop protocols for FDA 820, ISO 3485 compliance. Prior to consulting Jan was a Quality Manager at Biomet and Senior Quality Supplier Engineer at Medtronic.

Joel Martinez

Joel Martinez

As a former certified ORA BIMO FDA Investigator, Joel Martinez has completed 20-25 BIMO inspections in all therapeutic areas, interacting with CDER’s Office of Scientific Investigations (OSI) medical reviewers and BIMO Office of Compliance personnel for CBER, CDRH and CVM. He has significant experience in recognizing and understanding significant inspectional observations which would warrant further regulatory action and assists clients with understanding critical areas for a Sponsor/CRO in terms of being compliance with applicable 21 CFR regulations. Joel also conducts GLP audits domestically and internationally gaining inspectional experience of non-clinical laboratories.

A Successful Expert Witness is One Who can Demonstrate Expertise While Connecting with a Jury

An effective Expert Witness is more than one who can write expert opinions, be deposed or provide testimony in court. Experts must represent your company accurately, independently and objectively in matters of legal proceedings and do so in a manner that enables them to communicate to, connect with, and convince the decision maker, whether that decision will be made by a jury or mediator. Agencies, judges and juries want to hear from well-respected and knowledgeable expert witnesses. Whether the issue is recalls, labeling claims, safety audits, or almost any other challenge to a facility or a product, having a competent expert by your side can make all the difference.

EAS independent advisors and consultants are routinely called to serve as an expert witness in a variety of cases. Our team of over 50 former high-level FDA officials and industry executives who act in an expert witness capacity average over 25 years of regulatory experience and include some of the most well-known and highly respected names in the industry. These experts have the knowledge, qualifications, and experience necessary to explain and clarify issues to our clients and the courts while establishing credibility and persuasiveness as witnesses.

If EAS can be of assistance as you prepare for your next litigation or mediation challenge, please reach out to Dean Cirotta, President and COO directly. EAS will assure that the specific needs and requirements of your case will be matched with an expert whose knowledge and experience enhances your client’s legal standing.

March 2019 Drug and Device Corner

Implementation of reorganization to begin for CDRH

In order to create a smart and quick-moving infrastructure that can adapt to the needs of future organizational, regulatory and scientific requirements, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) is beginning the implementation of a reorganization. 

The reorganization will integrate CDRH’s premarket and post-market program functions along product lines, allowing their experts to leverage their knowledge to optimize decision-making across the product life cycle. This type of approach blends many of the current aspects of product review, quality, surveillance and enforcement into a new, team-based approach. With the implementation of reorganization, the FDA aims to enhance information-sharing across the Center, increase collective decision-making, improve work-life balance and increase professional opportunities for employees.

The implementation is set to begin March 2019 and is expected to be completed by September 2019. FDA says the implementation will take place in a phased approach, and timelines for implementation will vary by office. Each office within the current CDRH structure is undergoing some change in order to better support and advance CDRH’s public health mission and vision.

More information can be found here.

CDER:

Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Systemic Drug Products for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis

Severely Debilitating or Life- Threatening Hematologic Disorders: Nonclinical Development of Pharmaceuticals

Evaluation of Bulk Drug Substances Nominated for Use in Compounding Under Section 503B of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act

Quality Considerations for Continuous Manufacturing

Bioavailability Studies Submitted in NDAs or INDs — General Considerations

Assessing the Effects of Food on Drugs in INDs and NDAs — Clinical Pharmacology Considerations

Smoking Cessation and Related Indications: Developing Nicotine Replacement Therapy Drug Products

CDER & CBER:

Pediatric Information Incorporated Into Human Prescription Drug and Biological Product Labeling

Rare Diseases: Natural History Studies for Drug Development

Pediatric HIV Infection: Drug Product Development for Treatment

Enrichment Strategies for Clinical Trials to Support Determination of Effectiveness of Human Drugs and Biological Products

Considerations for the Inclusion of Adolescent Patients in Adult Oncology Clinical Trials

Cancer Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Patients with Organ Dysfunction or Prior or Concurrent Malignancies

Cancer Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Minimum Age for Pediatric Patients

Cancer Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Brain Metastases

Nonproprietary Naming of Biological Products: Update

CDRH & CBER:

Acceptance and Filing Reviews for Premarket Approval Applications (PMAs)

Refuse to Accept Policy for 510(k)s

CDRH:

Medical Devices Containing Materials Derived from Animal Sources (Except for In Vitro Diagnostic Devices)

Implanted Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Devices for Patients with Paralysis or Amputation – Non-clinical Testing and Clinical Considerations

CBER:

Standards Development and the Use of Standards in Regulatory Submissions Reviewed in the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

Providing Lot Release Protocol Submissions to the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) in Electronic Format

All Centers:

A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring of Clinical Investigations Questions and Answers